Telemundo Frets SCOTUS Might Uphold Mississippi Abortion Ban

In a report that shows the extent to which Latino corporate media is in the tank for abortion, Telemundo questions the Supreme Court’s right to let states protect the lives of – hear this – not a fetus but A “CHILD.”

This was the case in Telemundo’ report on Hoy Dia about SCOTUS’ decision to hear arguments on Mississippi’s abortion ban. Watch as the reporters were more concerned about the government having a say in preventing the abortion of A CHILD of up to six months, because, according to Rebeka Smyth, you can be “..in a situation where, sometimes, you lose control.”

REBEKA SMYTH: Well, what is truly concerning, as we were debating, is that this is an issue that is going to generate debate. You may be for it or against it, and you have every right to be for it or against it. The issue is whether government should be able to decide, in cases of rape or incest, whether that child lives- and the kind of life given to that child. So, it’s as you said, Nacho.  No one wakes up saying “I want to have an abortion”. You’re in a situation where, sometimes, you lose control.

ARANXTA LOIZAGA: Of course- it’s a personal decision and at the end of the day, every woman has the right to decide over her own reproductive ability. The  important thing, as you said, is that the makeup of the Supreme Court, we are now talking about six conservatives and three liberals, and so there’s a very interesting balance here. Let’s see what happens.

SMYTH (CUTS IN): And it will be Amy Coney Barret’s first (abortion) case who, you’ll recall, was the justice appointed by President Trump.

It should be noted that the four-and-a-half-minute report gave a scant 19 seconds of airtime to a pro-lifer. 19 seconds. To the viewpoint preferred by Telemundo’s own audience. 

Reporters fretted that the Supreme Court now has a conservative majority that can determine “whether a child lives and the kind of life that child will have,” which on its face is a new and disgusting kind of fake news. Although “the kind of life that child will have” is outside the scope of this case, it is part of the left’s preferred fallacy regarding pro-lifers allegedly being against government assistance and therefore not really being pro-life. 

Even more shocking- while attempting to justify abortion, Smyth in fact speaks about BABIES. Seldom do you see someone inadvertently recognize the inherent humanity of a potential victim of abortion as clearly you see here, with the Spanish term “criatura”, which is reserved for a child, or “little one”.

Anchor Loizaga’s closing statement, however, confirms that for Telemundo, the most important thing about this whole issue is not women’s rights, or the baby’s rights, but in her own words: “The important thing… is that now the makeup of the Supreme Court, we are talking about six  conservatives and three  liberals”, to which Smyth added, “And it will be Amy Coney Barret’s first case, which you will remember was the judge president Trump appointed.” It always goes back to the Bad Orange Man.

“The battle for reproductive rights will definitely continue to heat up”, said Smyth. What remains to be seen is whether Telemundo’s audience, most of which holds traditional family values and opposes abortion, gets any deference, or are bunched together under the liberal Latinx pretense.

Press on expand to view the complete transcript of the above mentioned report as aired over Telemundo’s Hoy Día, on May 18, 2021:

Telemundo’s Hoy Día
May 18, 2021

ARANXTA LOIZAGA: At a time when the right to abortion was believed to be an unassailable conquest for women here in the United States, many believe that the right to decide over their own body could be threatened.

NACHO LOZANO: And it is, especially after the Supreme Court issued notice that when they enter into their session in the fall, they will analyze whether Mississippi can keep a ban on abortions after the 15th week of pregnancy. It is a privilege to have Rebeka Smyth, our fellow journalist, at the desk to bring us the details about this controversy. Rebeka, how are you?

REBEKA SMYTH: That’s right. Like you said Nacho, a controversy. And after many attempts, the Supreme Court agreed to hear a case on the right to abortion, and that ruling could limit that right, hard-fought by many. But that’s not the most alarming thing, as they can also (decide) who can have an abort and who can’t. Listen in.

All abortion laws are controversial, and the Mississippi law is no exception. It restricts abortion to the 15th week of pregnancy, with the only exceptions being medical emergencies and severe fetal abnormality. But not so in other cases, like rape or incest.

JOSEPH MALOUF: What the Supreme Court has done is to accept a challenge regarding the constitutionality of a Mississippi law that bans a woman from having an abortion if she is already in her 15th week of pregnant or beyond. That’s quite contrary to the Supreme Court’s 1976 opinion in Roe versus Wade, where the Supreme Court ruled that a woman can have an abortion up to 24, 23 to 24 weeks into her pregnancy. So that’s essentially what’s being fought in the Supreme Court.

SMYTH: This case has been postponed on the docket more than a dozen times; it poses a challenge to Roe vs. Wade, the iconic 1973 Supreme Court decision that legalized abortion in the United States.

The issue of abortion is understood by conservatives to be a moral one, with religious hues, and that is why they oppose diverse measures.

PAMELA MORALES, HUMAN LIFE: We believe in the freedom of every woman to be able to decide over her body and her own life. However, that freedom should not undermine the right of every human being, to life and to be born. Our Constitution protects the right to life as the primary right, and fundamental pillar of human rights. Without that right, the other rights would not exist.

SMYTH: As the opposition sees it, abortion is understood as the right of people to make reproductive decisions and the right of women to decide about their bodies.

STEPHANIE TAVAREZ: I support abortion. I think that as a woman I have every right to do whatever I want with my body.

SMYTH: This case will be addressed by the Supreme Court in the fall, and will be the first one over abortion to be dealt with after former President Trump set up a strong conservative majority in the court during his tenure.

MALOUF: Well, with a Supreme Court that has a majority of six conservatives against three,  anything can be expected in an opinion on this case. At the same time, I want to remind people that the Supreme Court follows precedents and rarely changes such a drastic decision, uh, and it could happen in this case, but they have to justify it, which I don’t think will be very easy to do.

SMYTH: The battle for reproductive rights will definitely continue to heat up.

Well, what is truly concerning, as we were debating, is that this is an issue that is going to generate debate. You may be for it or against it, and you have every right to be for it or against it. The issue is whether government should be able to decide, in cases of rape or incest, whether that child lives- and the kind of life given to that child. So, it’s as you said, Nacho.  No one wakes up saying “I want to have an abortion”. You’re in a situation where, sometimes, you lose control.

LOIZAGA: Of course- it’s a personal decision and at the end of the day, every woman has the right to decide over her own reproductive ability. The  important thing, as you said, is that the makeup of the Supreme Court, we are now talking about six conservatives and three liberals, and so there’s a very interesting balance here. Let’s see what happens.

SMYTH (CUTS IN): And it will be Amy Coney Barret’s first (abortion) case who, you’ll recall, was the justice appointed by President Trump.

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