Racist Sharpton Claims the ‘White Church’ Is ‘Sinning’ for Not Teaching Critical Race Theory

On Sunday’s PoliticsNation, Al Sharpton collaborated with pastor of the Metropolitan African Methodist Episcopal Church in Washington, D.C. Reverend William H. Lamar IV to launch racist attacks on the American democracy as yet to be realized, white Christians as less-than-genuine Christ followers, and the “white church” for preaching white supremacy and purposefully wanting to deny African-Americans the chance to accept Christ.

In response to six Baptist seminary leaders refusing to add critical race theory to their curriculums, Lamar labeled white church leaders as “plutocrats,” “oligarchs,” and “kleptocrats” with Sharpton claiming that, based on their skin color, “they’re sinning.”

Sharpton led into Lamar’s appearance with his trademark race hustling by lumping in each and every white American with the Proud Boys in light of their behavior last weekend in Washington D.C. ripping down Black Lives Matter signs at two black churches and clashing with BLM activists (click “expand”):

But in the face of this hatred, it begs a question that my next guest asked in an op-ed published in The Washington Post in response to the violence inflicted onto the black community, “Will America replace its racist myth?” 

With me now, the Reverend William H. Lamar IV. He is the pastor of the African — the Metropolitan African Methodist Episcopal Church in Washington, D.C. Thank you for being with us, Reverend Lamar. I — I — I want to read a passage you wrote in response that was in The Washington Post: “The mythology that motivated the perpetrators on Saturday night was the underbelly of the American narrative that white men can employ violence to take what they want and do what they want, and call that criminality justice, freedom, and liberty.” So why can’t white America come to terms with this racist myth and how can it be replaced, Reverend Lamar because they call that patriotism[.]

Referring to his jam-packed August 28 gathering on the National Mall that the left and their media allies had no issue with, Sharpton lamented: “I can only think of when just in August when we had the big march in Washington, over 200,000 people and no violence, if we had one, just one person throw something, a piece of paper across the Lincoln Memorial reflector pool, they would have called it a riot and everything else.”

Asserting that American democracy has not yet been “realized,” he labeled white Americans as “the problem” and that they must collectively atone for seemingly their existence and the sins of distant ancestors (who actually did engage in slavery and enact measures such as Jim Crow laws):

Their churches have not interrupted it, the myth of white supremacy, the myth of white settler colonialism. Their politicians by and large have not interrupted it…We are not the problem. The problem is white supremacy and what it does to human beings, what it does to communities, what it does to people black and white and so what we need is a concerted effort from within the white community to turn the page on this narrative, to say that this truly will be a democracy that is multicultural, multi-faith, multiethnic and really for me, democracy in America is aspirational. It has not yet been realized because of what we saw Saturday and because of what we continue to see in our policies at the federal level, at the state and local level as well. 

A perfect far-left activist, Lamar went onto demand that critical race theory become embedded in church teaching because the Bible ostensibly is an insufficient roadmap for growing God’s kingdom and preaching that we’re all made in His image:

Critical race theory says we will read America through the lens of our experience as a people, we will call out where race has shaped law, economics, politics…[Y]ou have no capitalism without enslavement, that those things are linked together, they are unraveling the myth and telling the story from our perspective and essentially what those six seminary presidents are saying is we refuse to see history, economics, and politics from anyone’s perspective other than our own white perspective. 

Sharpton and Lamar then nastily attacked white seminary leaders for not integrating critical race theory into their curriculums and Sharpton even claimed that “they’re sinning” for not doing so (click “expand”):

LAMAR: [I]f you go to their church, they will lambaste you about your individual sin but they have no reason or no desire to recollect the sins that gave us what we now have. So they want personal repentance, but they do not want corporate repentance, political repentance and you and I know that every progressive move we see politically is always met by a huge counterforce to turn things back to the status quo. 

SHARPTON: That’s right. 

LAMAR: They have the religion of the status quo. Ours is the faith of interruption, the faith of justice, and we don’t want anybody to not enjoy God’s abundance. We want all people to enjoy what is possible but they want to restrict it to the moneyed few. They are plutocrats, they are oligarchs, they are kleptocrats, they are not small d Democrat.

SHARPTON: And if we were to read others that dealt with this kind of immoral society while you deal with personal morality, they’re sinning.

Critical race theory treats all people as being nothing more than a part of their racial groups, so it was sadly unsurprising that church leaders would reject such a message. It seems that Sharpton and Lamar are much less concerned with Christianity than using the church to push a far-left agenda and drive people of all races apart.

This racism was sponsored by Walmart and Uber Eats. Let them know here if you think they should be sponsoring this content.

Read the full December 20th transcript here:

MSNBC’s PoliticsNation
12/20/20
5:30 p.m. Eastern

AL SHARPTON: The act of recorded hate crimes in this country has been on the rise. Last Saturday, the far-right group the Proud Boys took to the streets of Washington, D.C. and attempted to terrorize the black community by causing violence and destroying several Black Lives Matter flags from two historic black churches in the area. The Proud Boys leader this week even took credit for defacing church property, saying he was responsible for burning a Black Lives Matter banner. But in the face of this hatred, it begs a question that my next guest asked in an op-ed published in The Washington Post in response to the violence inflicted onto the black community, “Will America replace its racist myth?” With me now, the Reverend William H. Lamar IV. He is the pastor of the African — the Metropolitan African Methodist Episcopal Church in Washington, D.C. Thank you for being with us, Reverend Lamar. I — I — I want to read a passage you wrote in response that was in The Washington Post: “The mythology that motivated the perpetrators on Saturday night was the underbelly of the American narrative that white men can employ violence to take what they want and do what they want, and call that criminality justice, freedom, and liberty.” So why can’t white America come to terms with this racist myth and how can it be replaced, Reverend Lamar because they call that patriotism and they call that, as — as you said, many things and I can only think of when just in August when we had the big march in Washington, over 200,000 people and no violence, if we had one, just one person throw something, a piece of paper across the Lincoln Memorial reflector pool, they would have called it a riot and everything else. But these people are patriots, not condemned by the President. I mean, how do we deal with this myth and this language change that’s so conveniently done? 

REVEREND WILLIAM H. LAMAR IV (PASTOR OF THE METROPOLITAN AFRICAN METHODIST CHURCH IN WASHINGTON D.C.): Reverend Sharpton, thank you for having me and on the behalf of the people of the Metropolitan, I want to thank you because some years ago when we needed you, you came and preached and helped us in our time and so we thank you. As far as your question, it is because nothing in a sustained way within the white community, within the community of the evangelicals has interrupted the narrative. So persons from outside of the narrative have interrupted it, but their churches have not interrupted it, the myth of white supremacy, the myth of white settler colonialism. Their politicians by and large have not interrupted it. You go back to what DuBois said in the early part of the 20th century, how does it feel to be a problem? We are not the problem. The problem is white supremacy and what it does to human beings, what it does to communities, what it does to people black and white and so what we need is a concerted effort from within the white community to turn the page on this narrative, to say that this truly will be a democracy that is multicultural, multi-faith, multiethnic, and really for me, democracy in America is aspirational. It has not yet been realized because of what we saw Saturday and because of what we continue to see in our policies at the federal level, at the state and local level as well. 

SHARPTON: And — and the white community should be led by the white church. I — I note that six seminary presidents in the Southern Baptist tradition said they don’t want to even have taught in their seminaries a — a critical race history and Reverend Ralph West and others protested this and left the — the gathering on — of that denomination in terms of their association because of not only are they not responding in a way you’re saying, they are in effect saying we’re going to not allow the discussion in some elements of the white church. 

LAMAR: You know, what’s fascinating too about that Reverend Sharpton, is that critical race theory is 30 years old. Derek Bell, who taught constitutional law, was one of those at the fountain head of that intellectual movement and essentially critical race theory says we will read America through the lens of our experience as a people, we will call out where race has shaped law, economics, politics. If you read The Color of Law by Higginbotham, if you read the work that shows us that you have no capitalism without enslavement, that those things are linked together, they are unraveling the myth and telling the story from our perspective and essentially what those six seminary presidents are saying is we refuse to see history, economics, and politics from anyone’s perspective other than our own white perspective. 

SHARPTON: Yeah.

LAMAR: And you cannot have any kind of a sustainable community where people in power refuse to even hear criticism. Now these are the same people, Reverend Al, if you go to their church, they will lambaste you about your individual sin but they have no reason or no desire to recollect the sins that gave us what we now have. So they want personal repentance, but they do not want corporate repentance, political repentance and you and I know that every progressive move we see politically is always met by a huge counterforce to turn things back to the status quo. 

SHARPTON: That’s right. 

LAMAR: They have the religion of the status quo. Ours is the faith of interruption, the faith of justice, and we don’t want anybody to not enjoy God’s abundance. We want all people to enjoy what is possible but they want to restrict it to the moneyed few. They are plutocrats, they are oligarchs, they are kleptocrats, they are not small d Democrat.

SHARPTON: And if we were to read others that dealt with this kind of immoral society while you deal with personal morality, they’re sinning.

View Original Source Source