Pushing Fear: Panicked CBS Touts ‘Climate Anxiety’ Among Teens for Earth Day

The journalists at CBS This Morning on Thursday used Earth Day as an excuse to promote fear, touting “climate anxiety” among teens. The reporters also, yet again, hyped alarmist Greta Thunberg and her campaign to enact draconian, expensive global warming laws.

Talking to young environmentalist Georgia Wright, who has a podcast, co-host Anthony Mason pushed the idea that young people should be emotionally unstable over climate: “Georgia, you discuss climate anxiety in the podcast. We heard Julianna mention feeling her chest tighten when she talks about this. What do you mean exactly climate anxiety?

Before that, reporter Adriana Diaz talked to Thunberg, promoting her expensive agenda: “The message is that while individual actions are important, sweeping change needs to come from governments and corporations. At every opportunity, the 18-year-old pushes leaders to follow the science, pointing to the pandemic as a model for swift action.”

The show also allowed Thunberg to revise history. Discussing the teen’s 2019 boat trip across the Atlantic, Thunberg now stated it was supposed to be symbolic. Here’s the exchange:

ADRIANA DIAZ: Documentary cameras were there as Greta Thunberg set sail across the Atlantic Ocean in the fall of 2019.

GRETA THUNBERG: I wound up feeling very well today.

DIAZ: But the three-week voyage wasn’t for the reason you might think.

GRETA THUNBERG: It may sound very silly to take a boat across the Atlantic, and of course I’m doing that to lower my carbon footprint or something —

DIAZ: You’re not?

THUNBERG: Of course not. That would be quite pathetic. It doesn’t really make much difference.

But that’s not what CBS This Morning co-host Gayle King said on August 29, 2019:

A world-famous teenage climate activist is in New York now after crossing the Atlantic in a solar-powered sailboat, wow. Greta Thunberg is her name. She arrived in Lower Manhattan yesterday after a two-week transatlantic journey. Now, she chose not at to fly because of the environmental impact of jet travel.

So which is it? Sending a symbolic message or the “environmental impact of jet travel?” It probably doesn’t matter to CBS, so long as the network gets to push an agenda of “climate anxiety.”

The propaganda on CBS was sponsored by Jeep and Toyota. Click on the links to let them know what you think.

A partial transcript is below.

CBS This Morning

4/22/2021

8:36

ANTHONY MASON: Now to more of our special Earth Day coverage. A new PBS and BBC documentary series follows environmental activist Greta Thunberg around the world as she experiences fist hand the human impact of climate change. Greta Thunberg: A Year to Change the World, airs tonight on PBS. Adriana Diaz spoke with the teenager who was at her apartment in Sweden as part of our series Eye on Earth: Our Planet in Peril.”

ADRIANA DIAZ: Documentary cameras were there as Greta Thunberg set sail across the Atlantic Ocean in the fall of 2019.

GRETA THUNBERG: I wound up feeling very well today.

DIAZ: But the three-week voyage wasn’t for the reason you might think.

GRETA THUNBERG: It may sound very silly to take a boat across the Atlantic, and of course I’m doing that to lower my carbon footprint or something —

DIAZ: You’re not?

THUNBERG: Of course not. That would be quite pathetic. It doesn’t really make much difference. But I’m doing it to send a message to the people.

DIAZ: The message is that while individual actions are important, sweeping change needs to come from governments and corporations.

THUNBERG: World leaders are behaving Dr so it falls on us to be the adults in the room.

DIAZ: At every opportunity, the 18-year-old pushes leaders to follow the science, pointing to pandemic as a model for swift action. Any lesson learned that we can apply to environmentalism?

THUNBERG: We can’t treat something like a crisis once we decide to do it. We have also seen what can be achieved when we put resources into science. Vaccines were developed at record speed. So the science is not the thing that’s holding us back.

CROWD: Climate Justice! When do we want it? Now!  

DIAZ: While Thunberg may be the best-known climate change activist in the world, she is just one of a whole generation of young environmentalists who refuse to back down.

THUNBERG: We young people are the ones who are going to be affected the most by the climate crisis. We will actually be around when the worst consequences will start to occur.

KING: like Greta Thunberg, our next two guests, rather, among the young environmentalists making a difference, a big difference. Julianna Bradley and Georgia Wright created the Inherited podcast to share stories from the youth climate movement. Here’s a clip.

KING: And we don’t really want you to shut up, Julianna Bradley and Georgia Wright join us now. Good morning to you both. Really good to see you. I love the podcast. It’s so well done. It’s so well done. You guys are such bad asses, what you’re doing out there. I think it was you, Georgia, Julianna, your dad said, “Look, you need to stop talking about this or else you’re not going to be invited to parties. Whose dad said that?”

ANTHONY MASON: Georgia, you discuss climate anxiety in the podcast. We heard Julianna mention feeling her chest tighten when she talks about this. What do you mean exactly climate anxiety?

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