Nets Uninterested in California Ruling to Release Sex Offenders, Pedophiles

According to the likes of ABC, CBS, and NBC on Tuesday, the only thing newsworthy coming out of the State of California was their struggle with the coronavirus. But what they tried to keep under the radar was the state’s radical Supreme Court ruling that so-called “nonviolent” sex offenders could not be excluded from the state’s early parole program.

Instead of informing their viewers of California’s disturbing favoritism to sex offenders and pedophiles, the networks continued to boast about President-elect Joe Biden bashing President Trump’s vaccine distribution efforts. They also elevated Biden’s detail-free claim he’ll vaccinate one million Americans a day in his first 100 days in office.

It was a good thing that Fox News Channel’s Special Report was there to shed a light on what the liberal news outlets wanted to cover-up.

The release of such vile people stemmed from ballot proposition 57, which was pushed by former California Governor Jerry Brown (D). Despite Brown’s original promise that sex offenders and pedophiles would not be included in the early parole program, “Voters, experts say, may have been duped,” as reported by Fox News national correspondent William La Jeunesse.

“Now, the state Supreme Court says otherwise. ‘The proposition provides no indication that the voters intended to exclude from parole consideration an inmate’s sex offense when the inmate was convicted of a nonviolent felony,’” La Jeunesse read from the sickening ruling. As he read that, the on-screen headline accurately stated: “California goes soft on sex offenders.”

Adding: “Prop 57 was one of several efforts to reduce prison overcrowding. Attorneys say the ruling means up to 20,000 inmates could be released early. Largely because only state law defines violent felonies, Prop 57 did not.”

La Jeunesse included a soundbite of Republican Assemblyman Jim Patterson, who was disgusted by the court’s decision. “There’s nothing nonviolent about pimping. There’s nothing nonviolent about raping an unconscious individual. There’s nothing nonviolent about the possession of child pornography,” he argued.

There were also clips from a 2016 symposium on the proposition, where one apparent proponent thought it was funny that they weren’t clearly informing voters on what a so-called “nonviolent” felony was:

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: What are some examples of nonviolent felonies?

DREW SODERBORG (California legislative analyst): So, one thing that we noted is that the measure doesn’t define nonviolent felony.

LA JEUNESSE: So, voters only knew what they were told or single paragraph in the voter guide, something experts at his symposium for informed voters found funny.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: Where is that list posted?

SODERBORG: Um, that list is in a section of the penal code. It’s section 667.5. B maybe? [Laughter from crowd] I don’t know how helpful that is for you.

“It’s now up to the state Corrections Department to determine which inmates are eligible for a hearing and early release. Officials put the number between 4 and 5,000,” La Jeunesse concluded.

So, apparently, thousands of sex offenders and pedophiles were possibly going to be released to victimize more people, and the broadcast networks couldn’t be bothered to critically cover the liberal wonderland.

The transcript is below, click “expand” to read: 

Fox News Channel’s Special Report
December 29, 2020
6:19:55 p.m. Eastern

BRET BAIER: The California Supreme Court says inmates convicted of nonviolent sex crimes cannot be denied a chance at early parole consideration. National correspondent William La Jeunesse looks at the ruling and the response from Los Angeles.

[Cuts to video]

WILLIAM LA JEUNESSE: Out of office but not the news. In 2016, former California Governor Jerry Brown bankrolled Prop 57. Offering nonviolent inmates early parole. Sex offenders, Brown claimed, did not qualify.

CHARLES CHUNG (California DOJ lawyer): This decision to exclude registered sex offenders was also informed by the promises made by Governor Brown.

LA JEUNESSE: Now, the state Supreme Court says otherwise. “The proposition provides no indication that the voters intended to exclude from parole consideration an inmate’s sex offense when the inmate was convicted of a nonviolent felony.”

JIM PATTERSON (R-Assemblyman): There’s nothing nonviolent about pimping. There’s nothing nonviolent about raping an unconscious individual. There’s nothing nonviolent about the possession of child pornography.

LA JEUNESSE: Voters, experts say, may have been duped.

KIM NALDER (Sacramento State University, 2016): The arguments in favor and the arguments against are by proponents and opponents and they are not vetted for accuracy necessarily. And so, it’s possible that there is something that could be exaggerated or misleading.

LA JEUNESSE: Prop 57 was one of several efforts to reduce prison overcrowding. Attorneys say the ruling means up to 20,000 inmates could be released early. Largely because only state law defines violent felonies, Prop 57 did not.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: What are some examples of nonviolent felonies?

DREW SODERBORG (California legislative analyst): So, one thing that we noted is that the measure doesn’t define nonviolent felony.

LA JEUNESSE: So, voters only knew what they were told or single paragraph in the voter guide, something experts at his symposium for informed voters found funny.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: Where is that list posted?

SODERBORG: Um, that list is in a section of the penal code. It’s section 667.5. B maybe? [Laughter from crowd] I don’t know how helpful that is for you.

[Cuts back to live]

LA JEUNESSE: It’s now up to the state Corrections Department to determine which inmates are eligible for a hearing and early release. Officials put the number between 4 and 5,000. Bret.

BAIER: The fine print. William, thank you.

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