Michael Eric Dyson Touts Defunding Police on ‘View:’ Abolishing Slavery Angered White Americans, Too

Georgetown sociology professor, frequent guest on MSNBC/CNN, and NYT opinion contributor Michael Eric Dyson plugged his latest book about America’s racism to the friendly hosts of The View Tuesday. While there, the race-baiting academic praised Black Lives Matter and Defund the Police, even comparing the latter movement to the abolition of slavery. 

Whoopi Goldberg started off the show asking Dyson what he thought about the pandemic, the election and protests. After blaming his technical problems on President Trump, (“Yeah, You-know-who was undermining me. Look, stop hating on me, brah. I got to call you out!’) Dyson went on to tout the Black Lives Matter protests as a reckoning for America’s racism. He expressed hope that Joe Biden’s administration would be the one to turn things around for blacks:

And the President of the United States of America with his megalomania has been a megaphone for the worst instincts in America and for the most vicious denunciation of our humanity. Thank God we shifted from this president to a new president, President Biden and Vice President Harris who understand the nature of existence for people of color and for all of us to come together. 

That was the cue for co-host Sunny Hostin to ask how Biden will be the president to help black Americans:

When you look at President-Elect Biden’s victory speech, he acknowledged the significant impact black American voters had on his and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris’ historic win. He recognized that and he said ‘you’ve always had my back and I’ll have yours.’ In your view, how do you think he can best do that? We heard about his lift every voice plan for black America. But how does he bridge this divide? How does he make it better for black Americans? 

Dyson gushed over Biden’s pandering to the black community: “Yeah that’s a great point. First of all, when have you heard a president say that? What president in American history has explicitly articulated his debt, what he owes to African-American people because he recognizes we had his back, now he has ours. That’s beautiful,” he gushed. It seems Biden’s many racial gaffes and association with KKK leader Robert Byrd didn’t taint that fond assessment. 

The professor and political analyst went on to urge Biden to listen to the far left if he really wants to help black people: “He has to reach over to Progressive forces within the Democratic party,” he stated before listing economic inequality, health disparities and police brutality as the major issues Biden needed to address.

Talking about police brutality, he outrageously compared Americans against defunding the police to whites against abolishing slavery:

…[W]e are living in a nation where if you hold your hands up you get shot. If you put them down you get shot. If you agree with the police you get shot. If you don’t agree with the police, you get shot. The fact is, it’s not what we do. It’s who we are that seems to exacerbate tensions between law enforcement and African-American communities. We have to address that. I know some people have been outraged by the use of abolish the police. Guess what? In the 1850s many white Americans were against abolishing slavery. So that the very word ‘abolition’ has caused some people problems, it has been a longstanding tradition in America…

Dyson’s whole career seems to be based off attacking Republicans and white Americans as racists. Earlier this year on the show, he moaned that President Trump wanted to take us back to the confederacy just by mentioning the film Gone With the Wind. He wailed, “Let’s get “Birth of a Nation” back there because we don’t have enough of that kind of kowtowing and cooning [bleep]!”

Likewise in a 2018 appearance on The View, he labeled Republicans as racists who didn’t understand black people like Democrats did, and called President Trump’s tweets the “Feces of His Moral Depravity.” 

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Read a transcript below:

The View

12/1/2020

MICHAEL ERIC DYSON: Yeah, You-know-who was undermining me. Look, stop hating on me, brah. I got to call you out. This is the global pandemic I was talking about. The global pandemic of the virus and the pandemic of racism. As you all have brilliantly talked about it we have been grappling with this since the beginning of this nation’s history. Here we are now and George Floyd opened the minds of many people. But as Ms. Goldberg suggested, absolutely, that we know from the very beginning people have not been missing the pandemic in slavery, in Jim Crow, in white water fountains and black water fountains, in horrible schools that we were relegated to. So we’ve been building up to this for a while. Maybe because we were all at home. The pandemic had us watching our screens. When George Floyd’s death occurred, when the knee of Derek Chauvin was imposed upon the neck of George Floyd, his already mortally bruised column, his neck, he was asphyxiated and people said this is enough. Even white brothers and sisters said we have to hit the streets along with black brothers and sisters because this is enough. And the President of the United States of America with his megalomania has been a megaphone for the worst instincts in America and for the most vicious denunciation of our humanity. Thank God we shifted from this president to a new president, President Biden and Vice President Harris who understand the nature of existence for people of color and for all of us to come together. We got to make E pluribus unum–out of many, one. 

SUNNY HOSTIN: Michael I was saying, when we lost you, when you look at President-Elect Biden’s victory speech, he acknowledged the significant impact black American voters had on his and vice president elect Kamala Harris’ historic win. He recognized that and he said ‘you’ve always had my back and I’ll have yours.’ In your view, how do you think he can best do that? We heard about his lift every voice plan for black America. But how does he bridge this divide? How does he make it better for black Americans? 

MICHAEL ERIC DYSON: Yeah that’s a great point. First of all, when have you heard a president say that? What president in American history has explicitly articulated his debt, what he owes to African-American people because he recognizes we had his back, now he has ours. That’s beautiful. 

First of all, not being Donald Trump is a huge start. Number two, try to forge connections between disparate groups. We know he has a reputation for reaching across the aisle. That’s good. But He has to reach over to Progressive forces within the democratic party. And also what are the issues that particularly plague African American communities. 

We know that criminal justice reform is a necessity. We know that dealing with the disproportionate impact of this COVID virus upon black and brown bodies is serious. We know the educational disparities in this country are huge. And we know the gulf between the have gots and the have nots. Home ownership, because the greatest bleedoff of black wealth ever, happened during the housing bubble that burst on black Americans. 

So when you address those issues, along with police brutality, we are living in a nation where if you hold your hands up you get shot. If you put them down you get shot. If you agree with the police you get shot. If you don’t agree with the police, you get shot. The fact is, it’s not what we do. It’s who we are that seems to exacerbate tensions between law enforcement and African-American communities. We have to address that. I know some people have been outraged by the use of abolish the police. Guess what? In the 1850s many white Americans were against abolishing slavery. So that the very word ‘abolition’ has caused some people problems, it has been a longstanding tradition in America. But as a leftist, myself, as a progressive, I’m not wed to any language. I don’t want the commercial. I want the product. Give us the relief of suffering. When somebody calls the authorities for a person who is mentally unstable, don’t send the cops with their batons and taser. Send a productive therapist or somebody who’s trained to relief the hurt and pain they might experience so they won’t be killed. So defunding the police is another way of saying let’s reassign moneys to those elements and those departments in our public safety realm that attend to the hurts and pains of people who are most at risk. When we do that, we can respect the fact we want law and order. We just want when the cops show up they don’t see us automatically as the criminals and begin to hurt us and harm us in ways that many white brothers and sisters can scarcely imagine. 

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