Clogged Heart Ready to Die: Stelter Decries Fox News Celebrating 25 Years

Invoking a tone one would expect a parent to use to inform a child of something tragic, CNN’s Brian Stelter concluded Sunday’s so-called “Reliable Sources” by informing his meager viewers that Fox News would be celebrating its 25-year anniversary the coming week. Warning them that they could see commercials for it, Stelter lashed out at his ratings superior by equating them to the diseased heart of the Republican Party, ready to give out at any moment. He even suggested Fox had torn apart families.

“You’ll probably hear a lot about Fox News this week. The network is turning 25 and running lots of commercials celebrating its birthday,” he announced in his clownishly sober tone. “But you won’t hear any honest assessment of Fox on Fox of how the network has changed America.

After hawking his trashy anti-Fox News book, yet again, Stelter suggested Fox was about to have a heart attack, grotesquely whining about them being patriotic after 9/11, and bashing them for being pro-America:

But the network evolved or devolved into the beating heart of the GOP, a heart with clogged arteries and weak muscles. It’s the network that brought us inspirational stories about the military and middle America, but also smothering patriotism after 9/11, and a portrayal of the U.S.A. that seems stuck in a time warp.

The idea that someone with Stelter’s physique would say Fox had “clogged arteries and weak muscles” was as rich as his favorite chocolate cake.

Fox is the network that brought us Megyn Kelly, and Jesse Waters, and Greg Gutfeld, and Tomi Lahren, and Shep Smith narrating a llama chase. I mean, that was fun. I’ll never forget the llamas,” he howled.

Meanwhile, CNN has given us Chris “Fredo” Cuomo and his affinity for Antifa terrorists, the unhinged and nonsensical ramblings of Don Lemon, carnival barker Jim Acosta, shrieking Angela Rye and April Ryan, and they gave Carl Bernstein’s floundering career a second life.

But for all the fun, there’s so much darkness in Fox’s history,” he sneered as he brought up Roger Ailes:

You won’t see Roger Ailes in the retrospectives, but his abuse of women, his leg cam, his paranoia, his rage; it’s what translated into the network that exists today. Full of rage, anger. It’s the whitelash on TV, although, often delivered with a smile. Ailes also brought us Donald Trump.

Do you know what you won’t see in any CNN retrospectives? How they helped Saddam Hussein peddle propaganda, how they tried to defame a teen as a racist and were forced to pay him money, how both Cuomo and Lemon were accused of sexual assault and weren’t fired, how boss Jeff Zucker has torn down the company and its reputation, or how they’ve eviscerated journalistic ethics.

And speaking of Zucker’s handiwork, Stelter said Fox brought us Trump but it was Zucker who made him a household name with his Apprentice show on NBC. That’s not to mention how they flooded their coverage of the 2016 GOP primary with Trump.

And as he was wrapping up his vapid rant, Stelter equated Fox News to a tool of arsonists, declaring: “…the political science research is clear: Fox is not just a mirror, it’s an accelerant.” He then touted the coming release of another anti-Fox News book “The Brainwashing of My Dad and it’s about exactly what you think.” “For the families who feel they have been torn apart by Fox, this week is not a happy anniversary,” he squeaked.

In reality, it’s the leftist kids who just can’t accept the fact that their parents had different opinions and were rabid enough to ruin their relationship over it.

Brian Stelter’s ridiculous monologue railing against Fox News was made possible because of lucrative sponsorships from Blue Cross Blue Shield and Salonpas. Their contact information is linked so you can tell them about the biased news they fund.

The transcript is below, click “expand” to read:

CNN’s Reliable Sources
October 3, 2021
11:58:42 a.m. Eastern

BRIAN STELTER: You’ll probably hear a lot about Fox News this week. The network is turning 25 and running lots of commercials celebrating its birthday. But you won’t hear any honest assessment of Fox on Fox of how the network has changed America. So, let’s size it up for a minute before we go.

Fox wasn’t always the political beast it is today. As the first co-host of the morning show that became Fox & Friends told me for my book Hoax, “It was not very political at all. I was not very political and neither was the show back then. It was pop culture sprinkled with the day’s news.”

But the network evolved or devolved into the beating heart of the GOP, a heart with clogged arteries and weak muscles. It’s the network that brought us inspirational stories about the military and middle America, but also smothering patriotism after 9/11, and a portrayal of the U.S.A. that seems stuck in a time warp.

Fox is the network that brought us Megyn Kelly, and Jesse Waters, and Greg Gutfeld, and Tomi Lahren, and Shep Smith narrating a llama chase. I mean, that was fun. I’ll never forget the llamas.

But for all the fun, there’s so much darkness in Fox’s history. You won’t see Roger Ailes in the retrospectives, but his abuse of women, his leg cam, his paranoia, his rage; it’s what translated into the network that exists today. Full of rage, anger. It’s the whitelash on TV, although, often delivered with a smile. Ailes also brought us Donald Trump.

Executives might say they’re merely holding a mirror up to America’s divisions, but the political science research is clear: Fox is not just a mirror, it’s an accelerant. There’s a new book coming out about this on Tuesday, it’s called The Brainwashing of My Dad and it’s about exactly what you think.

For the families who feel they have been torn apart by Fox, this week is not a happy anniversary.

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