ABC Spikes Own Poll Showing Disapproval of Biden’s Handling of Crime

On Sunday, ABC News released a new poll showing what they describe as “[President] Biden’s approval” hitting “new lows” “on many issues.” But in the two days it’s been out, they’ve only mentioned it once on-air and completely omitted the large majority of Americans who disapprove of his handling of the spike in crime across the country. They also refused to show many Americans didn’t trust him with Russia. In addition, neither CBS nor NBC have covered the new poll on their newscasts.

ABC did cover some of the results during Monday’s Good Morning America, after ignoring them all Sunday. “Also a new ABC News/Ipsos poll suggests more than two-thirds of Americans disapprove of President Biden’s handling of inflation,” noted chief anchor George Stephanopoulos with loud music playing over him. “A solid majority, 57 percent, disapprove of the economy in general.”

That mention lasted a whole nine seconds.

Instead of covering any of their poll on Monday’s World News Tonight, anchor David Muir and chief Washington correspondent Jonathan Karl spent almost two minutes (1:52) covering the House January 6 Committee moving to hold former Chief of Staff Mark Meadows in contempt of Congress.

NBC Nightly News also spent nearly two minutes (1:55) on the committee’s actions as well. And all three touted California and New York reinstituting in-door mask mandates.

And on the foreign policy front, the poll found a vast majority of Americans didn’t trust Biden to negotiate with Putin. “This poll finds that most Americans (55%) disapprove of how Biden is handling relations with Russia. Further, only 38% of Americans trust Biden to negotiate on America’s behalf with Putin,” they wrote online. This too was also omitted from the air.

Meanwhile, Fox News Channel’s Special Report did nearly an entire segment based on the poll finding a majority of Americans disapproving of Biden’s handling of crime. “Just 36 percent of Americans approve of President Biden’s handling of crime in the new ABC/IPSOS poll,” reported White House correspondent Peter Doocy.

Since the disapproval rate was 61 percent, that would surely fall under what Stephanopoulos described as a “solid majority.”

Doocy also highlighted a soundbite of him grilling Press Secretary Jen Psaki on the White House’s poor strategy to fight crime while embracing disastrous, progressive bail reform:

DOOCY: What good does it do if you are going to give police departments extra money if they arrest bad guys, and they bring them to jail, and then they are not prosecuted; they’re just right back out on the streets?

PSAKI: I think, Peter, what our focus is on is making sure that the local leaders, the police officers and departments who know what they need for these communities have the assistance and the funding they need. And that’s what we are working around the clock on.

“There are plenty of things that officials around here would rather talk about than crime: Covid vaccines, the Build Back Better plan, electric vehicle charging stations, you name it. But as officials in big cities struggle to keep innocent people safe, as crime rates rise, it’s unavoidable,” he concluded.

ABC’s omission of their own poll showing bad approval numbers for Biden was made possible because of lucrative sponsorships from Wayfair and Fisher Investments. Their contact information is linked so you can tell them about the biased news they fund.

The transcript is below, click “expand” to read:

Fox News Channel’s Special Report
December 13, 2021
6:06:30 p.m. Eastern

BRET BAIER: President Biden facing a myriad of serious challenges tonight and they are cutting into his already low approval numbers. At the top of the list this holiday season is crime amid a rash of high-profile high-end robberies scaring some shoppers away from the most crucial economic period of the year for retailers.

The President also facing an uphill political battle over massive tax and spend agenda that social spending bill still pending in Congress. White House correspondent Peter Doocy has the latest tonight.

[Cuts to video]

(…)

PETER DOOCY: Officials are also making the case they are on top of rising crime rates.

PRESS SECRETARY JEN PSAKI: We have also worked directly with police departments in areas where they are seeing the highest impact of the crime. The retail threat, which we have great concern about.

DOOCY: But it keeps happening like this weekend in Chicago.

JOE PERILLO: They have people come break in to your store while there’s customers shopping and there are children in there.

DOOCY: Joe Perillo’s luxury car dealership was targeted. And he’s blaming weak leadership the mayor and the Cooks County state’s attorney.

PERILLIO: Mayor Lightfoot I don’t know her and I don’t know Kim Foxx. They’re probably are good people. They’re probably trying to do good for their community, but they’re good bad for their community.

DOOCY: Just 36 percent of Americans approve of President Biden’s handling of crime in the new ABC/IPSOS poll.

JIMMY FALLON: How much do you pay attention to approval ratings?

PRESIDENT JOE BIDEN: Well, not anymore.

DOOCY: For now, they’re not willing to ask prosecutors to get stricter with sentencing.

What good does it do if you are going to give police departments extra money if they arrest bad guys, and they bring them to jail, and then they are not prosecuted; they’re just right back out on the streets?

PSAKI: I think, Peter, what our focus is on is making sure that the local leaders, the police officers and departments who know what they need for these communities have the assistance and the funding they need. And that’s what we are working around the clock on.

[Cuts back to live]

DOOCY: There are plenty of things that officials around here would rather talk about than crime: Covid vaccines, the Build Back Better plan, electric vehicle charging stations, you name it. But as officials in big cities struggle to keep innocent people safe, as crime rates rise, it’s unavoidable. Bret?

BAIER: Peter Doocy live on the north lawn, Peter, thank you.

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